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On an unrelated note, Get Tor.

There WAS a Jordanian 80s pop band called “Hot Ice” and It’s as Awesome As You Think.

HAHA! Just discovered an 80s Jordanian pop band that sings in English and is called Hot Ice. Hani Jordan, one of the best youtube old video archivists brings us this gem from the 80s, taken from a French TV show, of a music clip for one of the band’s songs called you’ll never guess what, “Never After”! Even the video is shot in pretty old vintage Amman. AND IT ALL SOUNDS EXACTLY AS AWESOME AS YOU THINK! I WILL CHERISH THIS INTERNET GIFT FOREVER.

Know more about this band? Comment below!

Error 451 – Unavailable For Legal Reasons.

This status code indicates that the server is denying access to the resource as a consequence of a legal demand.

If you believe this message is an error and that you are legally entitled to access the content, click here. Note: This will set a cookie on your device that will expire in 1 hour.

On an unrelated note, Get Tor.

Tamer Abu Ghazaleh at Al Balad Music Festival

On the third day of Al Balad Music Festival (f, t), I was lucky to attend two concerts by Tamer Abu Ghazaleh and Maryam Saleh. In it’s third iteration now, Al Balad Music festival started in 2009, as an effort to present independent musical acts from the Arab world to the Jordanian audience. The festival venue is the renovated Odeon in Amman, a ancient Roman theater. What was interesting about the concert venue is the incredible acoustics, where the sound would be blaring inside the theater, but barely audible once you step out the door, which speaks volumes about the architecture skills of the ancient Romans.

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The first act for the day was Tamer Abu Ghazaleh, with his unique brand of Arabic Alternative music. As a vocalist, he shows amazing dexterity in shifting through various accents, tones and styles to deliver a remarkable variety of songs that he has composed, but written by a plethora of Arab literary icons, most notably the famous Arab poet Najeeb Al Suroor. Tamer echoes a forgotten voice of Arab music that was buried by decades of extremism and gentrification.

However, the main dynamic in the performance was the constant struggle between Tamer’s oriental instruments, his Oud and Buzzok, and the classical rock instruments, the bass, drums, and keyboards, all manned by accomplished musicians in their own rights. While the rest of the band would play together in harmony, even laughing and giving each other glances on stage, Tamer would stand alone with his chest out, holding his Oud unconventionally like a punk rocker would, vying to carve his own music out of the noise of rock. It’s a refreshing brand of Oriental fusion, unlike the norm where the Oud or Buzzok would bow for a mere complementary role. It’s in this dynamic of dissonance and the rebellious lyrics that the band was able to manifest the complex post-Arab Spring gestalt, making Tamer Abu Ghazaleh a live act that’s not to be missed.

The highlight of the show was the performance of the song “Breaking News”, the one in the music video below.

Follow my blog for the next part, where I review the amazing Maryam Saleh’s concert.

 

 

Jordanian Hate Cleric Qourshah Goes Crazy After Show Canceled, Blames Christians and Zionists

Today Jordan’s private TV channel Ro’ya decided to cancel hate cleric Amjad Qourshah’s show that was scheduled this Ramadan, after overwhelming public pressure. People’s objections varied between being against his sectarian calls for violence, referring to Arab Idol fans for celebrating Mohammad Assaf’s victory as heretics, and because of his attacks against pro-regime loyalists, and what they perceive as attacks against the Kingdom’s army and security forces.  His recent public outbursts on his Facebook page all contributed to his fall out of popularity in the country, just a year ago he was being touted as a shining beacon of moderate Islam in the country, and his shows on TV and Youtube were very popular, especially among the youth segments.

It didn’t take long for Qourshah to respond, with another classic outburst on his Facebook page. He started off with congratulating the “Zionists” and  “Lucifer” for winning this round, conceding that he has lost a large segment of Arab youth to their evil schemes. He then went on on a longer rant, mostly about Arab Idol, claiming that Palestinians have sold 65 years of misery for one night of debauchery in celebrating Mohammad Assaf’s victory. He also said that this is the same kind of brainwashing Christians in Andalusia did, eventually leading to the slaughter of Muslims there like sheep. To further prove his point, he also highlighted the Ottoman annexation Constantinople, as an example of when we “broke the will of the enemy”. He finished his rant saying that God’s victory is coming, and that we have to be prepared when it happens, and the only way to be prepared is to read the Quran and for women to be pious.

I did my best to translate the rant while preserving the right amount of crazy in it. I’m not sure how well Christian Jordanians will take to being described as the enemy. I’m relieved that his TV show got cancelled, but this is a lecturer at Jordan’s biggest university, and he still has a lot of support in Jordan, as of this moment his rant amassed 3000 likes in less than 3 hours. I think we need to apply more public pressure so that a man like this can longer poison the minds of our youth with his hate speech.

Libroswap at Startup Amman 2012 – Book Swapping as a Solution

I’m working right now on a startup project called Libroswap. The purpose of this project to facilitate the swapping of books between university and school students. Despite the many advances in technology these days, books remain an important source of knowledge. We simply cannot risk keeping this knowledge hidden in our closets and storage rooms while many need this knowledge to be freed.

Not to mention the fact that making more books requires trees, an ever more scarce commodity these days. We’re hoping that Libroswap can also have an ecological impact, as well as an economical impact in these times of economic struggle. Please help support our project at our FB page.

Drought and Treachery by ElFar3i

Elfar3i, the brainchild of Tareq Abukwaik, has always been something special. He’s always never afraid to speak out his mind, with socially-conscious music that always leaves you thinking. He is by far my favorite lyrically in the Ammani music scene. Also, full disclosure, he’s my cousin, and that the fact that we share some genes just makes me prouder. =D

I leave you know with his latest song, Drought and Threachery. Jordan is one of the poorest countries in the world when it comes to water, and Elfar3i’s minimalist guitar line perfectly illustrates that. The song goes into a cheerful chorus, that is a perfect analogy to the callous attitude people have towards water conservation, as the lyrics make reference to the common belief people have that God will deliver them from whatever problem they have, without them actually doing something about it. Enjoy this song by your brother, Elfar3i, and my favorite cousin. =D